GreyNav

Custom: Food Friends Header

Events
Media and News Center
Get Involved
Who We Serve
What We Do
Who We Are
logo

Subscribe to the Blog

November 1, 2011

FOOD DAY: How Did You Celebrate?

By: Janell Walker

 The first ever FOOD DAY was held on October 24th and the Nutrition Services department of Food & Friends celebrated by hosting a FOOD DAY Cook-Off. FOOD DAY was created by the Center for Science in the Public Interest to increase awareness about consuming sustainable foods, reducing diet related diseases and expanding access to food to alleviate hunger.

We challenged our staff to work together to create a dish that used at least two ingredients that were in season and locally purchased, within 100 miles.

Our competitors rose to the challenge and did such a great job that we couldn’t decide on one winner!! Two groups took home the title as co-FOOD DAY Cook-Off Champions.

Carrie, Quin and Elizabeth made a Squash Casserole that was loaded with flavor and a hint of heat.

Pam and Tamika made a Pork Tenderloin with Apple Chutney and Roasted Parsnips that melted in your mouth and was simply delectable.

Here is what each group had to say about their FOOD DAY experience:

Carrie, Elizabeth and Quin
Carrie, Quin and Elizabeth 
1. What sparked your interest in participating in the first ever FOOD Day Cook-Off?
“We decided to participate in Food Day because we thought it would be fun and different to honor the day. Plus, we wanted to challenge ourselves to prepare a dish that required seasonal foods.”

2. How did your team choose your winning dish?
“We had two options a beet salad or the squash casserole. The squash casserole won because we thought people prefer squash over beets.”

3. The challenge of the cook-off to was produce a spectacular meal with seasonal produce purchased locally. What obstacles did you encounter trying to meet the challenge?
“The only obstacle was deciding the dish”

4. What was the most fun part about creating this dish?
“The most fun part was watching everyone on your team do their part to make the dish come together. For example one person was responsible for sautéing, the other for cutting and so forth.”

5. What are some ways in which you could encourage the people around you to eat more locally?
“We are definitely going to utilize our local farmer’s market to support our community and indulge in great quality produce.”

Chilean Squash
Ingredients
4 cups of acorn and butternut squash
1 tbs olive oil
1 ½ cups of chopped onion
1 tsp salt
2 small bell peppers (red and green) minced
4 -5 cloves of garlic
Black pepper and cayenne, to taste
1 cup crumbled feta cheese
1tsp cumin
 ½ tsp dried coriander
1tsp chili powder
 2 cups of lacinato kale
 1 cup of grated cheddar cheese
Directions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a medium sized skillet. Add onion and kale, and sauté over medium heat for about 5 minutes. Add salt and bell peppers. Sauté about 5 more minutes or until the peppers begin to get soft.
  3. Add garlic, black pepper and cayenne pepper and sauté a few more minutes.
  4. Add the sauté to the squash and mix well. Spread into an ungreased 9-inch square baking pan. Sprinkle the top lightly with grated cheese
  5. Bake uncovered for 25-30 minutes, or until bubble
Tamika and Pam



Pam and Tamika
1. What sparked your interest in participating in the first ever FOOD Day Cook-Off?
Any excuse to cook is a good one as far as we're concerned! Collaborating on a recipe a great opportunity to come up with interesting flavor combinations and cooking styles too.

2. How did your team choose your winning dish?
We knew we wanted to do a braised meat and to do it using seasonal apple cider. To enhance the flavor of the apple used to cook the meat we chose an apple compote topping and as a starchier addition added roasted parsnip sticks.

3. The challenge of the cook-off to was produce a spectacular meal with seasonal produce purchased locally. What obstacles did you encounter trying to meet the challenge?
Our first choice of meats was beef short ribs but the local farmer's market was out. So a quick switch had to be made to pork shoulder which worked nicely in the end for the dish. Being flexible and open to trying new things can be an asset though at the farmer's market - it's a great way to discover new dishes.

4. What was the most fun part about creating this dish?
Collaborating. We both love talking about and creating food so we had a blast figuring out what we wanted to make. It was somewhat improvisational even down to the plating. We cooked the three components separately - Tamika did the compote and parsnips, Pam braised the pork - so we didn't know how it would all come together until we plated the dishes.

5. What are some ways in which you could encourage the people around you to eat more locally?
It's a myth that you can only find local food at a farmer's market - it's all around. Check out the labels on the produce in your grocery store, particularly on fruits and vegetables that are in season in your area. You might be surprised to find that there are things that are sourced locally. If local food's important to you, talk to your grocer and let them know that. They may have suggestions for products they have in stock and, if they hear feedback from their customers, may investigate more local food purchasing food options going forward.



Cider-Braised Pork Shoulder with Caramelized Onion and Apple Confit
Serves 4
Ingredients
2 1/2 lb. (1.25 kg.) tied pork shoulder
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 large yellow onions, halved, thinly sliced
1/4 cup (60 ml.) Calvados brandy
1 large Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored, cut in 1/2″ cubes
2 garlic cloves, chopped
1 teaspoon dried thyme or 1 tablespoon fresh thyme
1 cup (240 ml.) apple cider
1 cup (240 ml.) chicken stock
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
Directions

Preheat oven to 400 F. (200 C.)
Pat the pork dry and season with salt and pepper.  Heat oil in a large ovenproof pot or Dutch oven with a lid.  Brown pork on all sides, turning with tongs, 6-8 minutes per side.  Transfer pork to plate.
Pour off excess fat from pot.  Add onion and 1 teaspoon salt.  Sauté over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until onions are very soft and deep golden brown, 18-20 minutes.  Add Calvados and stir to deglaze pan.  Add apple, garlic and thyme, and cook, stirring, 30 seconds.  Return pork to pot, nestling it down in the onions.  Add cider and chicken stock.  Cover pot and place in oven. Reduce heat to 325 F. Braise until meat is very tender, 2 1/2 – 3 hours. Transfer pork to a cutting board and remove kitchen strings.  Boil onion and apples until thickened and liquid slightly reduced, about 2 minutes.  Stir in mustard.  Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper.  Cut pork into serving pieces and arrange on platter or individual serving plates. Spoon onion and apple confit over and around the meat.

Apple Compote
Ingredients
  • 3 pounds apples, such as Granny Smith, Pink Lady, and Rome Beauty, peeled, cored, and cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 2 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon Calvados, apple brandy, or Cognac, optional
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions

  1. Combine all ingredients in a large pot. Cover, and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, until apples are tender, about 30 minutes. Let cool completely.
Roasted Parsnips
Ingredients
6 Parsnips
1 TBSP Salt
½ cup Olive Oil
½ cup Balsamic Vinegar
Directions
1. Cut parsnips into 2 inch long and ¼ inch wide sticks.
2. Toss cut parsnips into olive oil and balsamic vinegar and sprinkle with salt.
3. Bake in the oven at 350 degrees for 45 minutes






No comments:

Post a Comment